Weekend Parking

Attention WordCampers:

Many people have been asking about the parking situation around Bucketworks.

On Saturdays, the parking on 5th Street directly in front of Bucketworks is metered parking. If you plan to park here, be sure to bring plenty of change because the parking attendants are very strict. We recommend finding parking on side streets that are free and for longer periods of time.

Side street parking limits vary. Some side streets closest to Bucketworks have a 2 or 3 hour limit.

Our recommended parking area is one block east of Bucketworks on 4th Street. This is right next to Bradley Tech. Parking here is open and free when school is not in session. It looks like there are spots with the same regulations just north and south of National Avenue. See map below for area.

parking-map

Thank You Sponsors!

WordCamp Milwaukee is upon us, and we’d like to thank all of our sponsors for their generous support of this second WordCamp weekend!

Please visit the Sponsor page and visit their websites for more information about these folks. If you see their representatives during WordCamp, thank them too!

One more time, WordCamp Milwaukee 2013 sponsors are:

Pillar

Bluehost

Cruiser

ZippyKid

Sport

WebHostingHub
WebDev Studios

Champion

Dreamhost

Touring

Code Poet
Backup Buddy

Dirtbike

Orion Group
Sultan Solutions
Snow Day Group

Moped

Tuna Traffic
ServerPress

Venue

Bucketworks

In-Kind

Sticker Giant (in-kind providing stickers)
C2 Graphics Productivity Solutions (in-kind providing food at Thursday Meetup)

Speaker Highlight: Jessica Dunbar

Jessica DunbarWhat performance tips would you give to other pros (as related to speed, scalability, security, plugins, backup, etc.)?

Website Speed
Speed seems like a small issue to worry about, right? The speed of your website affects every metric you care about. Bounces, rankings, conversions, usability and most important, MONEY in your clients bank account.

Backups
How often should you be backing up your website? What is the maximum acceptable of data loss after a disaster?
It is easy to forget about the risks that face your website until you are obviously hacked and your defaced homepage reminds you that you should have backed up recently.

The ability to fully recover your websites and the process to restore websites are often not thought about in business or web companies.

Confess to us your biggest moment of WP fail?

This is a success story, with an unexpected failure and direct quote from a client:

“Thanks to all your hard work, we had so much traffic last week that OSC server had to shut my site down, something with the bandwidth. Our IT guy said that was because too many people were entering the site and said I needed to update my hosting, more data etc., I don’t know all the lingo… But anyway we canceled service with OSC and went with Amazon server.

I have been the on the first or second spot on the first google page consistently ever since you started working your magic dear & I have to say that we are so impressed with your ability.”

Favorite plugin?

Better WP Security, and WordPress SEO by Yoast.

If you could change one thing today about WP, what would it be?

Security:

There is a plethora of security advice for wordpress websites to prevent them from being hacked. It is very important to realize that website security is a process and not a single task, and that the only completely invulnerable site is one that is offline. I feel these best practices need to start in the community, and an easy place to find vulnerable plugins.

If you were interviewing another WordPress developer for a job, what is the first question you would ask and why?

Q: Do you prefer to work alone or on a team?

At watchful.li, our work environment requires team-oriented developers. Our projects include close interaction with other developers, project managers, and marketers. There are many developers that prefer to work solo, and it works for them. Make sure every developer you interview fits your work environment needs.

Welcome and What to Expect

I'm Attending WordCamp MilwaukeeThe following email was sent to all registered attendees and is being posted to the blog for reference. This email contains a lot of valuable information on what to expect when attending WordCamp.

———-

Hello WordCampers,

It’s the big week! WordCamp Milwaukee is upon us. Is everyone ready to learn and have a great time?

We have a lot of great things in store for the weekend that we think you’ll enjoy. Here is what you’re going to need to know about the weekend so you know what to expect. For all of the latest news, be sure to follow us on the WCMKE blog at http://2013.milwaukee.wordcamp.org/blog and on Facebook (http://facebook.com/wordcampmke), Twitter (http://twitter.com/wordcampmke), and Google+ (http://wcmke.co/gplus). Be sure to share your experiences and use the official hashtag #wcmke.

Thursday, June 6

7PM @ Bucketworks – Milwaukee WordPress Meetup Special Edition – Debugging WordPress with John James Jacoby
We’re having a special edition of the WordPress Meetup to welcome everyone to town. There will be food and beverage provided by C2 Graphics. You do not need to have a WordCamp ticket to attend the meetup, but we do appreciate if you would RSVP here: http://www.meetup.com/Milwaukee-WordPress-MeetUp/events/118578532/

Friday, June 7

Noon @ Bucketworks – Registration begins for Foundation Friday Workshops
If you have a Foundation Friday User 101 or Developer 101 ticket you can begin registration at noon. Just come through the front door of Bucketworks to the Registration Desk. We can then check you in, give you your event badge, and direct you to your WorkShop rooms.

1PM-5PM @Bucketworks – Foundation Friday Workshops
If you have your ticket for one of the Workshops, this is when you will be meeting. It is not necessary to print tickets. We will be checking you off of our list at the door. You will be working with a team of 4-5 teachers who will be giving you the basics of using WordPress or developing with WordPress. It is recommended, but not required, to bring a laptop with you. You will be given at least one 15 minute break and bottled water will be provided.

Saturday, June 8

8am @ Bucketworks – Registration Begins for the weekend presentations
Starting at 8am you will be able to enter Bucketworks and begin registration. It will be a good idea to arrive early as we are expecting over 250 people at the event. It is not necessary to print tickets. We will be checking you off of our list at the door. We will hand out badges, t-shirts (sizes and availability not guaranteed), and some of our sponsors will have tables set up with info and swag. We will have coffee, water, and some snacks available for the morning.

8:45am @ Bucketworks – Opening Remarks
You will be introduced to some members of the organizing committee and we will give you the rundown on where everything is and what is ahead of you.

9am-11:45am @ Bucketworks – Morning Sessions
Presentations will begin at 9am. Each presentation should take 30-35 minutes followed by 10-15 minutes for Q&A. You will have a 15 minute break between each presentation. Sessions will take place in the Studio and Shop on the first floor and in the boardroom on the second floor. The Happiness Bar will be open on the second floor in the kitchen, where you can get 1 on 1 help form WordPress pros. Write down any passwords or other information that may be needed to help access your website. Water, coffee, and snacks will be available in the commons. We will also be opening the Motorcycle Photo Booth for you to use during breaks.

Noon @ Bucketworks – Lunch
We will be providing you with a lunch of Sandwiches and Salads provided by the Milwaukee Waterfront Deli. Vegetarian options will be available and we are attempting to get some Gluten Free fare.

1:30pm-6:30pm @ Bucketworks – Afternoon Sessions
Presentations, photo booth, and Happiness Bar continue. Snacks, water, and coffee will be available in the commons.

7:30pm @ Milwaukee Brewing Company – After-Party
We invite everyone to come network, unwind, and have some fun at our After Party only 3 blocks away at the Milwaukee Brewing Company Brewery. You must bring your badges to gain admittance to the After Party. Everyone who attends can get a Brewery Tour which includes a free pint glass and samples of their great beer and root beer. We will be serving pizza from Transfer Pizzeria, ice cream from Purple Door Ice Cream, and also have soda and water to drink.

Sunday, June 9

9:30am @ Bucketworks – Doors open

10:00am-11:45am @ Bucketworks – Morning Sessions
Presentations begin. Snacks, Water, and Coffee will be available in the commons.

Noon @ Bucketworks – Lunch
We will be providing you with lunch provided by American Euros. They will be serving traditional lamb gyros, chicken gyros, and veggie gyros.

1:30pm-5:30pm @ Bucketworks – Afternoon Sessions
Presentations continue. Water and coffee will be available in the commons.

Social Media

We are looking for your help to document the happenings during WordCamp. Before coming to WordCamp, Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ then follow the directions below to share your photos with us.

Facebook:

Go to: http://wcmke.co/fb on your mobile phone, then snap a pic to upload to our Facebook page and tag yourself and your friends.

Twitter:

Snap a pic and/or send a tweet to @wordcampmke and be sure to use the hashtag #wcmke

Google+:

Go to: http://wcmke.co/gplusevent on your mobile phone, then snap a pic or leave an update on our event page.

Speaker Highlight: Heather Acton

Heather ActonWhat WP consultants deserve more love than they get? Who should we be paying attention to?

Michelle Schulp is doing amazing things for the community (WordCamp Chicago organization) and building some beautiful sites with her company Marktime Media.

Becky Davis is another wonderful developer and giving community member with a huge love for teaching. There’s nothing more valuable than those willing to help share the “”Word“”!

Kari Sharp is another up and coming developer who is also giving a ton to the community (Foundation Friday organization for WordCamp Chicago) and is building a very client services oriented business that will continue to help many small business owners in IL and WI.

What’s your favorite theme or theme framework? Why?

Lately I’ve really enjoyed doing theme modifications to Theme Trust themes and WooThemes. They serve as a very solid base for clients that don’t have the funds for full custom development, as they stick to WordPress good development practices (generally speaking).

What do you think is the biggest challenge that WP consultants will face in 2013?

Our company’s biggest challenge will continue to be keeping up with the demand for outstanding development services. We can’t keep up with all of the requests and often refer the business out, but even the companies I refer to are often too full. We need to continue to meet new developers, build efficient processes, and still ensure we offer top notch services to existing clients.

When I was able to put up my very own website in a matter of days, with no prior development experience, I was REALLY excited about WordPress. That was 4 years ago now, and I continue to be excited about the platform – the community is unmatched, the functionality continues to expand and simplify processes, and it is generally easy to use for clients.

AfterParty!!!

After a long, hard day of learning, networking and other WordPress goodness, you’ll want to unwind with a fine fermented malt beverage for which our city is so well known. We can help with that, and there’s more food to be had too. The 2013 WordCamp Milwaukee AfterParty is but a few blocks away from Bucketworks (so you can get some exercise too if the weather cooperates).

wcmke-after-party-map

Milwaukee Brewing CompanyThanks to our friends at Milwaukee Brewing and Transfer Pizza, the AfterParty is included with your WordCamp ticket!

You’ll be able to tour one of Beertown’s finest breweries, the home of Louie’s Demise, Love Rock Lager and Polish Moon Milk Stout, with unlimited samples, and a pint glass to keep. You even get a beer chip for a free MBC beer after the tour, to be used at a participating bar in the neighborhood.

Transfer PizzaMore fun and goodies:

  • Dinner features pizza and bruschetta from Transfer Pizza, including veggie and gluten-free varieties
  • Ice Cream from Purple Door Ice Cream
  • Soda and water available
  • Bean bag toss for your recreational needs
  • Many WordCamp speakers will be around for more conversation and questions

All in all, a great way to finish the day. Bring your badge for free admittance to all the festivities!

Where: Milwaukee Brewing Co., 613 S 2nd Street
When: 7:30pm Saturday, June 8

Speaker Highlight: Dan Pastori

Dan PastoriWhere do you go first to get your WP news, insights, and updates?

The people I follow on Twitter usually post the most up-to-date news and updates.

What WP consultants deserve more love than they get? Who should we be paying attention to?

Gilbert has a lot of quick tutorials on not only PHP/MySQL but also WordPress development. He made the Nivo slider which is famous, but I never heard of Gilbert until I ran into his blog.

What performance tips would you give to other pros (as related to speed, scalability, security, plugins, backup, etc.)?

Use WP cache in a live environment ALWAYS and when developing themes, make sure all resources are included correctly.

Confess to us your biggest moment of WP fail?

Hardcoding the AJAX url into my plugin and making my own AJAX handler which completely broke my OOP structure. Never thought that WordPress would be awesome enough to handle these requests by itself and make life easy ;)

If you were going to spend this weekend creating a plugin that doesn’t exist, what would it be?
Make a plugin that creates articles out of bullet point notes so I don’t have to waste time with filler. Kind of sci fi, but with a smart enough algorithm, possible.

Do you use Themes & Child Themes, Roll your own, or both?

Always custom.

What’s your favorite theme or theme framework? Why?

I like the 2013 theme that comes with WP 3.6 (the beta version). It’s responsive and slick.

Favorite plugin or least favorite plugin?

“Favorite plugin: WP Super Cache
Least Favorite Plugin: WP Super Cache

I guess it depends if it’s on the machine I’m developing on or a live site. It can be the smoothest plugin or the most frustrating.”

What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever done with Custom Post Types?

Nothing too spectacular. On a custom home slider, I combined custom post types while extending them with meta boxes which is pretty common I guess.

What do you think is the biggest challenge that WP consultants will face in 2013?

How to handle all the custom developments and plugin/theme combinations.

If you could change one thing today about WP, what would it be?

A setting to change the terminology if using WP for a site compared to a blog. Post could be Article and Taxonomy could be category or something else of that sort depending on use.

Where do you see WordPress going in the next 2-3 years?

I see WordPress staying about the same, but adding more functionality for plugins and theme development to make it feel more towards a Website CMS.

Tell us a story where you saved the WP day for yourself or on a client project. What made the difference for you?

We were transferring a WPMU network and ended up not fixing one of the database fields where the new domain would be. All we had to do was adjust the URL and we were good to go.

What’s the biggest misconception you encounter about WordPress, and how do you clear it up for your clients?

Trying to explain when to use a Post or a Page. To clear it up I try to explain it in an order of a hierarchy.

If you were interviewing another WordPress developer for a job, what is the first question you would ask and why?

How did you learn WordPress development? If they answer by reading the Codex and going to the forums, I will respect them way more than if they took a class and claim to know the content.

When was the first time that you really got excited about WordPress OR at what point did you decide to make it your career?

I first got excited about WordPress when I made my first plugin. It was a few years ago and that’s when I saw the potential to make WordPress more than just a blogging engine.

Speaker Highlight: Gloria Antonelli

Gloria AntonelliWhere do you go first to get your WP news, insights, and updates?

Getting information is a lot easier now then it was when I first started learning WordPress. My only options then were WordPress.org, Google and a few WordPress books. Now there are so many site that offer information on best practices, tutorials, conversations and forums. Some of my favorite learning channels are WP Water Cooler & WP Candy for current news, WordPress TV for WordCamp presentations, and as many WordCamps I can attend. Last year you could find me in the Dev track at 5 WordCamps across the Midwest and NYC. It also depends on what I want or need to know for a client site or if I want to just keep abreast of the evolution WP core.

Do you use Themes & Child Themes, Roll your own, or both?

I have done it all! Themes before the Parent/Child era, Child Themes and now designing/developing my own. Over the years I have worked with quite a few frameworks – Thematic, Hybrid and Genesis. Having framework experience has given me a great foundation for development.

What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever done with Custom Post Types?

Custom Post Types Cool Factor! I don’t know if the subject matter was that cool but I do enjoy developing the site architecture for Custom Post Types. First analyze the best user experience for finding the right mix of names and custom taxonomies to aggregate the information efficiently on large sites. My first CPT venture was an international conference site with 60 presenters and numerous sessions. Fun stuff!

What do you think is the biggest challenge that WP consultants will face in 2013?

I think the expanding Long Tail of WordPress Users is one of the biggest challenge. During my WordCamp 2011 session on Improving Support Docs for Themes and Plugins, I presented my Long Tail of WordPress Users – the infinite number of people using WordPress who have no or limited skills. New and non-tech users have a big learning curve including the admin UI, theme functionality, options page, widget areas and plugins. This multiple learning layer is huge. You can find this presentation on WordPress.TV.

When was the first time that you really got excited about WordPress OR at what point did you decide to make it your career?

I have been excited about web development since 1997! Working with WordPress was a natural progression. I first heard about WordPress from Peter Merholz (he coined the word Blog) at an Adaptive Path User Experience 2006 workshop. I started to develop sites and teaching WordPress in 2007. Those were the days of hacking away at themes, hard coding navigation and pre-child themes!

Sustaining Yourself Through the Journey

When you’re taking in so much information in a short period of time, your brain and body will naturally need a bit of sustenance to make it through. Fortunately, you don’t have to waste any brain cells wondering where you’re going to eat while at WordCamp. Food and beverages are included in your ticket! Let’s take a look at the menu:

Coffee, Snacks, and Water provided throughout WordCamp by Milwaukee Waterfront Deli, 761 N. Water Street in downtown Milwaukee.

Saturday Lunch: Sandwiches and salads by Milwaukee Waterfront Deli

Saturday AfterParty: assorted goodies from Transfer Pizza, 101 W. Mitchell Street (not all that far from Bucketworks). You’ll see more on the after party later in the week.

Sunday Lunch: Gyros and other pita sandwiches from American Euros, 3133 N. Oakland Avenue, near the UW-Milwaukee campus on the fashionable East Side, and out and around town in the summer.

Lunch will be served each day in the Bucketworks garage area, and you can eat pretty much anywhere. If it’s nice outside, you can even take it out on the Deck and look at the bees!

You’re really going to love this food, and it will get you in the right mood to learn some more. Yummmmm…

Speaker Highlight: Dan Nisbet

Dan NisbetWhat’s your favorite theme or theme framework? Why?

I’m a huge fan of the Genesis Framework. When I work with WordPress, my goals are more design-orientated, and I appreciate having Genesis there to cover the more technical aspects, from proper HTML to SEO.

If you could change one thing today about WP, what would it be?

Better image management. At the moment, its the one large downside I have with WordPress. Many of my clients have often requested ways of archiving or categorizing image files to make them easier to find, and I’m inclined to agree with them.

Where do you see WordPress going in the next 2-3 years?

Coming from its blog roots, I really see WordPress maturing into a content management system. Blogs have progressed from a simple list of posts to so much more these days and I think WordPress will be leading the charge.

What’s the biggest misconception you encounter about WordPress, and how do you clear it up for your clients?

The largest misconception I hear is that all WordPress websites look the same. While many WordPress websites can take on a particular look or style, showing clients my portfolio usually clears it up when they see the variety in my design.

When was the first time that you really got excited about WordPress OR at what point did you decide to make it your career?

I started using WordPress as a personal blog around 2005. At the time, I hadn’t really put any focus on my website as a designer and it was simply a playground for me to try new things. I was quickly impressed with the built in functionality of the time. It wasn’t long after that I was working it into more client projects!